Dairy Cattle

A total of 268 dairy farms produce 1.34 billion pounds of milk in Georgia. Dairy ranks 8th as an agricultural commodity in Georgia. Over 148 herds in Georgia are on DHI. They average over 21,000 pounds of milk and 300 cows each. Our goal is to extend lifelong learning about dairy production and management through research based information.

Dairy resources from UGA Extension


Cows
Valerie E Ryman Assistant Professor
Animal & Dairy Science
Jillian Bohlen Associate Professor
Animal & Dairy Science
Sha Tao Associate Professor
Animal & Dairy Science
Recent Dairy Publications from UGA Extension
Record Keeping for Dairy Operations in Georgia
(C 978)
Records are an asset as well as a regulatory requirement for permitted Georgia dairy operations. Although accurate record keeping takes a little additional time and effort, in some cases records (or a lack of records) can determine whether or not an operation stays in business.
Considerations for Using By-Product Feeds
(B 862)
By-product feeds come from a variety of sources, including grain processing, production of human foods and beverages, and manufacturing of fiber products. Although many of these feeds have been used for years, others are relatively new. Research has been conducted on most by-product feeds and the guidelines for their use are well documented; however, limited information is available on the feeding value or guidelines for using some by-product feeds. This publication discusses factors that should be considered when feeding by-product feeds to cattle.
Managing and Feeding Lactating Dairy Cows in Hot Weather
(B 956)
Hot and humid environmental conditions stress the lactating dairy cow and reduce intake of the nutrients necessary to support milk yield and body maintenance. In Georgia, weather conditions are sufficiently hot and humid to reduce performance of dairy cows for five months or more each year. This publication presents methods that can be used to minimize the stress on dairy cows during hot weather and enhance production during the hot summer months.
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